Thursday, 27 June 2013

Discount Real Estate Agents in Los Angeles

Each year, millions of United States residents make the decision to sell their home. If you are interested in becoming one of those individuals, you have a number of ways that you can go about selling your home. A large number of homeowners privately sell their own home, but even more obtain professional assistance.

If you live in or around the Los Angeles area, that assistance can come from a discount real estate agent. Discount real estate agents are agents that offer their services for a low or discounted price. Unfortunately, a large number of individuals believe that there is no such thing as a discount real estate agent. Los Angeles residents that believe this misconception could be paying more than they need to for real estate assistance.

To differentiate traditional real estate agents from discount real estate agents, you will have to determine the cost of using the services provided by each agent. This can easily be done by price comparison. Similar to comparing prices at your local supermarket, you will need to obtain price quotes from a number of Los Angeles real estate agents. After the information has been obtained, you can easily compare the prices to find the lowest fees.

The cost of service is not the only thing that should be examined when finding a discount real estate agent. Los Angeles residents are also urged to examine the services offered by each real estate agent. The service offered by each agent is important in determining what type of service you will receive for your money.

When examining the fees of discount real estate agents, it is likely that you will see their services differ from traditional real estate agents. The services are often not as inclusive as those offered by full price real agents. Just because the same services are not offered, does not mean that you should stop searching for a discount real estate agent. Los Angeles residents have found success using the services of a discount real estate agent. Many are more concerned with the amount of money they will be saving versus the level of service they would receive.

When searching for a discount real estate agent, you may find that there are only a select number of agents that can be considered discounted. This is because most real estate agents charge full price for their services. If you are interested in quickly finding a discount real estate agent, without having to compare a number of fees, you can use the internet to your advantage. You can easily perform a standard internet search to find a discount real estate agent. Los Angeles residents often search for agents this way.

Whichever way you choose to search for discount real estate agents, it is important to remember that they do exist. Do not believe hearsay from other homeowners or denials from full priced competitors. With a little bit of research, you can find a discount real estate agent. Los Angeles residents have been finding them for years and now you can too.

Tuesday, 25 June 2013

Boston Real Estate - You Still Have Considerable Control Over the Sale of Your Boston Home

Boston real estate is a hot topic. Daily newspaper articles comment on whether or not a bubble exists in the Boston real estate market, when and if it will pop, how interest rates affect the market, why Boston residents are snapping up interest-only loans, and how foreign investors in our treasuries keep interest rates low. There are articles about the location and amenities of Boston homes, why those factors make our region so desirable, and why the completion of the big dig is going to make Boston real estate even more desirable.

Journalists remark on the gentrification of our neighborhoods and the development of the Boston Seaport. Reporters poll Boston real estate agents for comments on the empty nesters moving out of suburban neighborhoods to buy luxury Boston condos, the rapid pace in which Dorchester homes are being converted into condos, whether large firms leaving the city might impact Boston real estate, or if bio-technology firms will continue to drive up home prices. We are flooded with theories and statistics of how the weather affects Boston real estate, or how the parking affects South Boston real estate. We hear about the growth of mortgage companies and the increase in mortgage products available to today's real estate consumer. It isn't unusual to hear dinner conversation revolving around the next investor hot spot, if having a buyer agent is a necessity, if a 5 year-arm is a good product for a Boston condo purchase, or if the success of the Patriots and Red Sox has any influence on the Boston real estate market.

However, as a Boston real estate agent, I do know that despite all of the external influence driving our market: foreign investors, fed hikes, an influx of jobs, and the relocation of Boston companies; the Boston homeowner still has a great amount of power and influence over the sale of their Boston home.


Despite what the Globe, the Herald, the Times or the WSJ reports about what drives the real estate market, people buy and sell homes. There are numerous factors that go into each home buying decision, and although everyone is different, there is some level of emotion that plays into the majority of home purchases. It could be that the buyer likes the cast iron lights that line the streets, the willow tree that shades the backyard, or the coffee-house at the end of the street. The prospective buyer might like the color of the living room or the view of the water from the second floor. It won't be the only reason to purchase your home, but for every purchase, there will be at least one defining influence that is based on emotion instead of reason.

And what that means for each seller is that when a prospective buyer walks into your Boston home, they are influenced by the color of your walls, the clutter on your shelves, the cleanliness of your windows. If your home looks like a page out of Home and Garden, then no matter how old, worn or non-existent their own furniture is, on some conscious or subconscious level, they will leave with the impression that their stuff would look this good if they moved into your home. Conversely, if your home looks like the before photo of Extreme Makeover, they might not be able to get past the wet dog smell or the fluorescent turquoise molding to see the beauty of your property. Here are a few guidelines that might be helpful when getting your Boston home ready for sale.

1) Don't give them reason to cross you off the list. While it would be ideal to put out flowers, light candles or bake a batch of cookies prior to open houses or showing appointments, the most important thing you can do is make sure there are no easy reasons to eliminate your house from the prospective pool of Boston housing stock. This means there should be no odors emanating from your home, pathways should be cleared for walking, and that nothing should be broken or falling down.

2) Paint walls neutral colors. In recent years there has been an explosion in the number of trendy paint colors, you might just love Tangerine Zing in the bathroom or Purple Rain in your kitchen. Consider repainting. It's much more difficult to have a hate relationship with Antique White or Ecru.

3) Eradicate clutter. Invest in some organizational storage equipment. You might ask yourself why you would make your home look perfect just as you are about to move out of it? It will be worth every penny and minute spent de-cluttering. You can take the letter sorter/shoe organizer/magazine holder with you. In the meantime, you want your countertops as clean and your closets as organized as possible.

4) Remove excessive furniture. Make rooms feel more spacious. If carpets are hiding nice hardwood floors, remove those too.

5) Let the sun shine in! Open blinds, pull back heavy curtains, but make sure the view is something that won't scare off a future buyer. Clean the windows so that they sparkle. Turn on all lights even during daytime showings. If you have views of the Boston skyline or shoreline, make them the focal point of the room!

6) Get curb appeal! Clean your gutters, get a new doormat, put a potted plant outside your door, and make sure your house number is visible.

The Boston real estate market is a complex and ever evolving marketplace. If you are looking to put your Boston home up for sale, being prepared and following our helpful tips on staging your home is the first step towards your success. Make sure you ask your listing agent how to enhance your Boston condo, single or multi-family home. Prospective buyers and Boston real estate agents will be scouring the MLS listings, websites and newspaper ads to find homes that are well kept and look appealing. As a seller in the Boston real estate market, you want your home to shine through in website photos, real estate ads and marketing materials.

Rooney Real Estate is a full service residential real estate company servicing South Boston, the South Boston Seaport, and Dorchester for more than twenty years. In 2003 Rooney Real Estate was recognized by LINK, the Listings Information Network, as the top real estate firm in South Boston, MA, in total sales revenue. On May 10, 2005, MLS (Multiple Listing Service) listed Rooney Real Estate as the top firm in South Boston, MA, in total sales and total dollar volume thus far in 2005. Rooney Real Estate also has an unparalleled record of giving back to the youth sports leagues and non-profit organizations in the communities they service.

Call 1-866 ROON DOG, or visit for more information.

Friday, 21 June 2013

Real Estate Licenses

A real estate license is the key to a lucrative career in the real estate industry. A real estate license is a powerful tool in the property business. Real estate will always be a dominant market in America. Homes will continue to be bought and sold throughout the state. Getting a real estate license will allow a person to be a part of this booming industry.

People decide to get real estate licenses for many reasons. Many like to work with the public. Some want to be in control of their own schedules. Others are interested in buying real estate for themselves and think that agents have access to 'the best deals'. For this purpose, a real estate license is mandatory. Real estate brokers are constantly looking for new, ambitious real estate sales people and there is significant money to be made in real estate sales.

Obtaining a real estate license in any state where a person may have interest in doing business is not difficult. However, it is important to know that obtaining a real estate license is not solely about taking a real estate exam. The process may differ from state to state. There is no such thing as a national real estate license. Each state has adopted and enforced its own laws and regulations regarding the sale of real estate, for the general purpose of protecting the consumer. Almost every state requires that the candidate complete some form of real estate pre-licensensing course. The successful completion of that course and the minimum number of training hours must be shown, before they will allow the candidate to schedule a real estate license exam. Most states permit the person to take this course not only online, but also in live classrooms, or even by way of a correspondence course.

For a successful career in the real estate business, it is now required by law to have a valid license. Many online education portals provide guidance for the process of acquiring a license. These agencies also provide adequate information regarding the various laws applicable in different states.

Wednesday, 19 June 2013

Home Buyers and Sellers Real Estate Glossary

Every business has it's jargon and residential real estate is no exception. Mark Nash author of 1001 Tips for Buying and Selling a Home shares commonly used terms with home buyers and sellers.

1031 exchange or Starker exchange: The delayed exchange of properties that qualifies for tax purposes as a tax-deferred exchange.

1099: The statement of income reported to the IRS for an independent contractor.

A/I: A contract that is pending with attorney and inspection contingencies.

Accompanied showings: Those showings where the listing agent must accompany an agent and his or her clients when viewing a listing.

Addendum: An addition to; a document.

Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM): A type of mortgage loan whose interest rate is tied to an economic index, which fluctuates with the market. Typical ARM periods are one, three, five, and seven years.

Agent: The licensed real estate salesperson or broker who represents buyers or sellers.

Annual percentage rate (APR): The total costs (interest rate, closing costs, fees, and so on) that are part of a borrower's loan, expressed as a percentage rate of interest. The total costs are amortized over the term of the loan.

Application fees: Fees that mortgage companies charge buyers at the time of written application for a loan; for example, fees for running credit reports of borrowers, property appraisal fees, and lender-specific fees.

Appointments: Those times or time periods an agent shows properties to clients.

Appraisal: A document of opinion of property value at a specific point in time.

Appraised price (AP): The price the third-party relocation company offers (under most contracts) the seller for his or her property. Generally, the average of two or more independent appraisals.

"As-is": A contract or offer clause stating that the seller will not repair or correct any problems with the property. Also used in listings and marketing materials.

Assumable mortgage: One in which the buyer agrees to fulfill the obligations of the existing loan agreement that the seller made with the lender. When assuming a mortgage, a buyer becomes personally liable for the payment of principal and interest. The original mortgagor should receive a written release from the liability when the buyer assumes the original mortgage.

Back on market (BOM): When a property or listing is placed back on the market after being removed from the market recently.

Back-up agent: A licensed agent who works with clients when their agent is unavailable.

Balloon mortgage: A type of mortgage that is generally paid over a short period of time, but is amortized over a longer period of time. The borrower typically pays a combination of principal and interest. At the end of the loan term, the entire unpaid balance must be repaid.

Back-up offer: When an offer is accepted contingent on the fall through or voiding of an accepted first offer on a property.

Bill of sale: Transfers title to personal property in a transaction.

Board of REALTORS® (local): An association of REALTORS® in a specific geographic area.

Broker: A state licensed individual who acts as the agent for the seller or buyer.

Broker of record: The person registered with his or her state licensing authority as the managing broker of a specific real estate sales office.

Broker's market analysis (BMA): The real estate broker's opinion of the expected final net sale price, determined after acquisition of the property by the third-party company.

Broker's tour: A preset time and day when real estate sales agents can view listings by multiple brokerages in the market.

Buyer: The purchaser of a property.

Buyer agency: A real estate broker retained by the buyer who has a fiduciary duty to the buyer.

Buyer agent: The agent who shows the buyer's property, negotiates the contract or offer for the buyer, and works with the buyer to close the transaction.

Carrying costs: Cost incurred to maintain a property (taxes, interest, insurance, utilities, and so on).

Closing: The end of a transaction process where the deed is delivered, documents are signed, and funds are dispersed.

CLUE (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange): The insurance industry's national database that assigns individuals a risk score. CLUE also has an electronic file of a properties insurance history. These files are accessible by insurance companies nationally. These files could impact the ability to sell property as they might contain information that a prospective buyer might find objectionable, and in some cases not even insurable.

Commission: The compensation paid to the listing brokerage by the seller for selling the property. A buyer may also be required to pay a commission to his or her agent.

Commission split: The percentage split of commission compen-sation between the real estate sales brokerage and the real estate sales agent or broker.

Competitive Market Analysis (CMA): The analysis used to provide market information to the seller and assist the real estate broker in securing the listing.

Condominium association: An association of all owners in a condominium.

Condominium budget: A financial forecast and report of a condominium association's expenses and savings.

Condominium by-laws: Rules passed by the condominium association used in administration of the condominium property.

Condominium declarations: A document that legally establishes a condominium.

Condominium right of first refusal: A person or an association that has the first opportunity to purchase condominium real estate when it becomes available or the right to meet any other offer.

Condominium rules and regulation: Rules of a condominium association by which owners agree to abide.

Contingency: A provision in a contract requiring certain acts to be completed before the contract is binding.

Continue to show: When a property is under contract with contingencies, but the seller requests that the property continue to be shown to prospective buyers until contingencies are released.

Contract for deed: A sales contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property but the seller holds title until the loan is paid. Also known as an installment sale contract.

Conventional mortgage: A type of mortgage that has certain limitations placed on it to meet secondary market guidelines. Mortgage companies, banks, and savings and loans underwrite conventional mortgages.

Cooperating commission: A commission offered to the buyer's agent brokerage for bringing a buyer to the selling brokerage's listing.

Cooperative (Co-op): Where the shareholders of the corporation are the inhabitants of the building. Each shareholder has the right to lease a specific unit. The difference between a co-op and a condo is in a co-op, one owns shares in a corporation; in a condo one owns the unit fee simple.

Counteroffer: The response to an offer or a bid by the seller or buyer after the original offer or bid.

Credit report: Includes all of the history for a borrower's credit accounts, outstanding debts, and payment timelines on past or current debts.

Credit score: A score assigned to a borrower's credit report based on information contained therein.

Curb appeal: The visual impact a property projects from the street.

Days on market: The number of days a property has been on the market.

Decree: A judgment of the court that sets out the agreements and rights of the parties.

Disclosures: Federal, state, county, and local requirements of disclosure that the seller provides and the buyer acknowledges.

Divorce: The legal separation of a husband and wife effected by a court decree that totally dissolves the marriage relationship.

DOM: Days on market.

Down payment: The amount of cash put toward a purchase by the borrower.

Drive-by: When a buyer or seller agent or broker drives by a property listing or potential listing.

Dual agent: A state-licensed individual who represents the seller and the buyer in a single transaction.

Earnest money deposit: The money given to the seller at the time the offer is made as a sign of the buyer's good faith.

Escrow account for real estate taxes and insurance: An account into which borrowers pay monthly prorations for real estate taxes and property insurance.

Exclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are excluded from the contract or offer to purchase.

Expired (listing): A property listing that has expired per the terms of the listing agreement.

Fax rider: A document that treats facsimile transmission as the same legal effect as the original document.

Feedback: The real estate sales agent and/or his or her client's reaction to a listing or property. Requested by the listing agent.

Fee simple: A form of property ownership where the owner has the right to use and dispose of property at will.

FHA (Federal Housing Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee by the FHA that a percentage of a loan will be underwritten by a mortgage company or banker.

Fixture: Personal property that has become part of the property through permanent attachment.

Flat fee: A predetermined amount of compensation received or paid for a specific service in a real estate transaction.

For sale by owner (FSBO): A property that is for sale by the owner of the property.

Gift letter: A letter to a lender stating that a gift of cash has been made to the buyer(s) and that the person gifting the cash to the buyer is not expecting the gift to be repaid. The exact wording of the gift letter should be requested of the lender.

Good faith estimate: Under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, within three days of an application submission, lenders are required to provide in writing to potential borrowers a good faith estimate of closing costs.

Gross sale price: The sale price before any concessions.

Hazard insurance: Insurance that covers losses to real estate from damages that might affect its value.

Homeowner's insurance: Coverage that includes personal liability and theft insurance in addition to hazard insurance.

HUD/RESPA (Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act): A document and statement that details all of the monies paid out and received at a real estate property closing.

Hybrid adjustable rate: Offers a fixed rate the first 5 years and then adjusts annually for the next 25 years.

IDX (Internet Data Exchange): Allows real estate brokers to advertise each other's listings posted to listing databases such as the multiple listing service.

Inclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are included in a contract or offer to purchase.

Independent contractor: A real estate sales agent who conducts real estate business through a broker. This agent does not receive salary or benefits from the broker.

Inspection rider: Rider to purchase agreement between third party relocation company and buyer of transferee's property stating that property is being sold "as is." All inspection reports conducted by the third party company are disclosed to the buyer and it is the buyer's duty to do his/her own inspections and tests.

Installment land contract: A contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property while the seller retains the title to the property until the loan is paid.

Interest rate float: The borrower decides to delay locking their interest rate on their loan. They can float their rate in expectation of the rate moving down. At the end of the float period they must lock a rate.

Interest rate lock: When the borrower and lender agree to lock a rate on loan. Can have terms and conditions attached to the lock.

List date: Actual date the property was listed with the current broker.

List price: The price of a property through a listing agreement.

Listing: Brokers written agreement to represent a seller and their property. Agents refer to their inventory of agreements with sellers as listings.

Listing agent: The real estate sales agent that is representing the sellers and their property, through a listing agreement.

Listing agreement: A document that establishes the real estate agent's agreement with the sellers to represent their property in the market.

Listing appointment: The time when a real estate sales agent meets with potential clients selling a property to secure a listing agreement.

Listing exclusion: A clause included in the listing agreement when the seller (transferee) lists his or her property with a broker.

Loan: An amount of money that is lent to a borrower who agrees to repay the amount plus interest.

Loan application: A document that buyers who are requesting a loan fill out and submit to their lender.

Loan closing costs: The costs a lender charges to close a borrower's loan. These costs vary from lender to lender and from market to market.

Loan commitment: A written document telling the borrowers that the mortgage company has agreed to lend them a specific amount of money at a specific interest rate for a specific period of time. The loan commitment may also contain conditions upon which the loan commitment is based.

Loan package: The group of mortgage documents that the borrower's lender sends to the closing or escrow.

Loan processor: An administrative individual who is assigned to check, verify, and assemble all of the documents and the buyer's funds and the borrower's loan for closing.

Loan underwriter: One who underwrites a loan for another. Some lenders have investors underwrite a buyer's loan.

Lockbox: A tool that allows secure storage of property keys on the premises for agent use. A combo uses a rotating dial to gain access with a combination; a Supra® (electronic lockbox or ELB) features a keypad.

Managing broker: A person licensed by the state as a broker who is also the broker of record for a real estate sales office. This person manages the daily operations of a real estate sales office.

Marketing period: The period of time in which the transferee may market his or her property (typically 45, 60, or 90 days), as directed by the third-party company's contract with the employer.

Mortgage banker: One who lends the bank's funds to borrowers and brings lenders and borrowers together.

Mortgage broker: A business that or an individual who unites lenders and borrowers and processes mortgage applications.

Mortgage loan servicing company: A company that collects monthly mortgage payments from borrowers.

Multiple listing service (MLS): A service that compiles available properties for sale by member brokers.

Multiple offers: More than one buyers broker present an offer on one property where the offers are negotiated at the same time.

National Association of REALTORS® (NAR): A national association comprised of real estate sales agents.

Net sales price: Gross sales price less concessions to the buyers.

Off market: A property listing that has been removed from the sale inventory in a market. A property can be temporarily or permanently off market.

Offer to purchase: When a buyer proposes certain terms and presents these terms to the seller.

Office tour/caravan: A walking or driving tour by a real estate sales office of listings represented by agents in the office. Usually held on a set day and time.

Parcel identification number (PIN): A taxing authority's tracking number for a property.

Pending: A real estate contract that has been accepted on a property but the transaction has not closed.

Personal assistant: A real estate sales agent administrative assistant.

Planned unit development (PUD): Mixed-use development that sets aside areas for residential use, commercial use, and public areas such as schools, parks, and so on.

Preapproval: A higher level of buyer/borrower prequalification required by a mortgage lender. Some preapprovals have conditions the borrower must meet.

Prepaid interest: Funds paid by the borrower at closing based on the number of days left in the month of closing.

Prepayment penalty: A fine imposed on the borrower by the lender when the loan is paid off before it comes due.

Prequalification: The mortgage company tells a buyer in advance of the formal mortgage application, how much money the borrower can afford to borrow. Some prequalifications have conditions that the borrower must meet.

Preview appointment: When a buyer's agent views a property alone to see if it meets his or her buyer's needs.

Pricing: When the potential seller's agent goes to the potential listing property to view it for marketing and pricing purposes.

Principal: The amount of money a buyer borrows.

Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI): The four parts that make up a borrower's monthly mortgage payment. Private mortgage insurance (PMI): A special insurance paid by a borrower in monthly installments, typically of loans of more than 80 percent of the value of the property.

Professional designation: Additional nonlicensed real estate education completed by a real estate professional.

Professional regulation: A state licensing authority that oversees and disciplines licensees.

Promissory note: A promise-to-pay document used with a contract or an offer to purchase.

R & I: Estimated and actual repair and improvement costs.

Real estate agent: An individual who is licensed by the state and who acts on behalf of his or her client, the buyer or seller. The real estate agent who does not have a broker's license must work for a licensed broker.

Real estate contract: A binding agreement between buyer and seller. It consists of an offer and an acceptance as well as consideration (i.e., money).

REALTOR®: A registered trademark of the National Association of REALTORS® that can be used only by its members.

Release deed: A written document stating that a seller or buyer has satisfied his or her obligation on a debt. This document is usually recorded.

Relist: Property that was listed with another broker but relisted with a current broker.

Rider: A separate document that is attached to a document in some way. This is done so that an entire document does not need to be rewritten.

Salaried agent: A real estate sales agent or broker who receives all or part of his or her compensation in real estate sales in the form of a salary.

Sale price: The price paid for a listing or property.

Seller (owner): The owner of a property who has signed a listing agreement or a potential listing agreement.

Showing: When a listing is shown to prospective buyers or the buyer's agent (preview).

Special assessment: A special and additional charge to a unit in a condominium or cooperative. Also a special real estate tax for improvements that benefit a property.

State Association of REALTORS®: An association of REALTORS® in a specific state.

Supra®: An electronic lockbox (ELB) that holds keys to a property. The user must have a Supra keypad to use the lockbox.

Temporarily off market (TOM): A listed property that is taken off the market due to illness, travel, needed repairs, and so on.

Temporary housing: Housing a transferee occupies until permanent housing is selected or becomes available.

Transaction: The real estate process from offer to closing or escrow.

Transaction management fee (TMF): A fee charged by listing brokers to the seller as part of the listing agreement.

Transaction sides: The two sides of a transaction, sellers and buyers. The term used to record the number of transactions in which a real estate sales agent or broker was involved during a specific period.

24-hour notice: Allowed by law, tenants must be informed of showing 24 hours before you arrive.

Under contract: A property that has an accepted real estate contract between seller and buyer.

VA (Veterans Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee on a mortgage amount backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Virtual tour: An Internet web/cd-rom-based video presentation of a property.

VOW's (Virtual Office web sites): An Internet based real estate brokerage business model that works with real estate consumers in same way as a brick and mortar real estate brokerage.

W-2: The Internal Revenue form issued by employer to employee to reflect compensation and deductions to compensation.

W-9: The Internal Revenue form requesting taxpayer identification number and certification.

Walk-through: A showing before closing or escrow that permits the buyers one final tour of the property they are purchasing.

Will: A document by which a person disposes of his or her property after death.

Monday, 17 June 2013

The Benefits of a Real Estate Auction

Many situations occur that are tailor-made for a real estate auction, but most, if not all, would fit under the category "time is of the essence."

Property A is sold, and on the strength of this sale, your client purchases Property B. Now sale A develops problems in escrow and the sale cannot close. The client is now in a state of hysteria since his only hope of closing on Property B in 60 days is by closing on Property A. What do you do? Auction Property A and arrange a sale date well in advance of the closing date on Property B, stipulating that part of the terms and conditions of the real estate auction is a quick closing. This can only be accomplished with a real estate auction.

A type of situation which dictates the advantage of a real estate auction is the high divorce rate and the need to dispose of the real estate quickly. Often neither party can afford to hold a property that they previously owned as husband and wife.

When a partnership dissolves, the situation often demands an immediate sale of the assets, including the real estate. Private negotiated marketing cannot guarantee a sale within a set, short time period. A real estate auction can.

Heirs to an estate that involves real estate are usually highly motivated for a fast sale. Most states encourage a real estate auction as a method for generating the highest price in the shortest period of time. Illness, or the need for immediate cash, or the inability of the owner to hold and maintain the real estate is another reason you should recommend a real estate auction. Holding costs can be crippling. All too often, the carrying or holding costs during a private negotiated marketing effort won't be recovered in a higher selling price. Instead the price is reduced. Therefore, the sooner a property sells, the greater the bottom line dollars in pocket for the seller.

An exchange being held up waiting for a buyer on one of the legs - auction it. The real estate auction can also work especially well in a "Bull Market". The law of supply and demand, where the demand exceeds the supply, is an ideal market to expose the real estate to competitive bidding to get the maximum return. The real estate auction is highly desirable in overbuilt or stagnant markets, where no reading exists on how low prices will fall or how long the market will stay overbuilt.

The private negotiated method and auction marketing method are different. A real estate auction can most generally guarantee a sale within a short period of time, and the attention is directed to the property being auctioned. Private negotiated marketing can't accomplish this.

Clearly, real estate auctions offer owners of all types of real estate advantages that are not available with private negotiated real estate firms.

All of us in the real estate profession are salespeople first and foremost. Let's forget for a moment the fancy titles and diplomas we have earned during our years in the business. The bottom line of success in our profession is still determined by our ability as salespeople. We constantly look for sellers so we have more listings. Our next step is to find the buyers.

A professionally managed real estate auction is a method of marketing that will find the buyers crawling out of the woodwork, and it is this benefit that will enable you to gain additional sales by offering your clients the real estate auction marketing option.

Saturday, 15 June 2013

2008 Internet Real Estate Agent

Happy New Year! Here's to 2008 being the year for taking your business and personal life to their highest level. The need for people to connect and exchange goods and services has been one of civilization's ongoing themes. Now, the need for people to get on the internet and search for real estate information is going to increase exponentially. The big question is, not how technology will advance the real estate industry, but rather how will you use it.

2008 poses many challenges for the real estate industry and its irrevocable relationship with the internet. How are you positioned to garner your share of targeted real estate leads and marketing potential of the internet? Are you investing in old traditional training techniques of sending out post cards, fancy listing presentation displays and a clever tag line? You already know that marketing to your sphere of influence and past clients is essential. But what other business systems have you implemented for seller or buyer leads?

How are you spending your education dollars and time? Now is the time to take action.

Search engine optimization and online lead generation is a competitive game, and it is growing more competitive by the day. You've read the articles, watched it on the news and read all the press releases. The biggest companies in real estate are investing the lion share of their resources to the internet. No more old traditional training, old school marketing or ideas. Major corporations are dumping money into their internet business in order to compete in the networked society we live in. What are you doing now to further your education and online real estate lead generation business? That's your challenge in 2008 and beyond.

As I've stated before, you can still create a very successful online real estate lead-generation business. However, these days are numbered.

The Web is big, but it's a finite resource. Well, more accurately said, cyberspace is infinite, but people will only dig so deep. Real estate Web sites that capture the top spots in the search engines are garnering high quality leads and massive lists of interested buyers and sellers. But, as more and more big-brand companies compete and figure out how to grab high ranking search engine positions, they will slowly but surely elbow out the little guy. It's the nature of an industry to be "open" to early adopters at the beginning and then slowly close to only those that can afford the great investment of time and money needed to stay competitive. As more and more buyers and sellers use the Internet for real estate research, the "evening and weekend traditional real estate agent marketing model" is fast becoming extinct.

If you want to stay competitive in the period ahead, you will need to grab a piece of the Internet action, and now is the time to establish your foothold. You CAN still create a successful real estate online lead-generating business. You CAN still get top spots in the search engines. It's not too late, but I guarantee if you wait, it soon will be.

More and more, I get calls from companies selling real estate leads. They notice I'm everywhere on the internet. My sites rank very high organically for specific real estate search terms and cpc. I also own the right spots on other real estate portals that drive targeted traffic to my listings, my sites and yes.....generate high quality, exclusive leads.

I just received a call from a company selling real estate leads. As published in my book, Internet Real Estate Agent: A Guide To Dominating Internet Real Estate Leads and Marketing, there are specific questions you must ask to avoid wasting money and time. After going back and forth with the skilled sales rep., I was able to hone down the basics of how the program works.

Here's how their lead program works:

1. A person is watching television, listening to the radio or sees a banner ad online. The add is asking the person to call a phone number to learn about a real estate tax advantage and commission rebate back to them if they buy or sell real estate.

2. Pay $60 a month for a zip code.

3. Pay 19% referral fee at closing (this gets split between the "lead company" and the customer at closing).

4. Here's the kicker....the leads are given to 7 other agents as well.

This real estate sales lead business model isn't new and many companies have a slight variation to it. Personally, I would never buy leads from this business model. I prefer to create my own exclusive lead systems.

Here's some of the pitfalls with the real estate lead business model you're being sold.

1. Leads coming from TV, Print, radio or the internet that rely on some form of incentive offer are usually very low quality leads. One of the incentive offers is a "commission rebate program". Need I say more?

2. Why pay a monthly fee so you can compete for the lead? Why not get EXCLUSIVE leads that are not incentive leads. You can't do every lead program on earth, so pick and chose how you spend your money and time.

3. I have a hard time paying a referral fee to someone when I'm competing with other agents, given a low quality lead and there's no personal relationship. That's not a referral, it's a lead. No relationship, no history and no commitment from the potential customer to use me. I like paying referral fees to agents that have personal relationships with their real clients. When I get a referral call from another agent, they know the person being referred to me and I get the client. That's a real referral and qualifies for that big referral fee.

4. There are so many ways to generate leads. You should pick and chose the best ways to spend your time and money.

After reading Internet Real Estate Agent, you won't fall prey to poor Internet business models. You may make a mistake or two--I do from time to time when trying something new--but, these mistakes are quickly remedied. You will understand exactly how to improve your real estate website, what to know before buying a real estate website, advanced concepts for Google AdWords, how to market your listings online for more leads, the changing Broker/Agent model and much more. Discover how to set up your own internet real estate lead generation machine. Don't be dependent on any one company for leads. Get educated and become independent!

The book will guide you through a tremendous amount of information and facts, not hype, regarding Internet real estate lead generation and Internet marketing. It's the lowest cost real estate training and education you will ever spend. It's all about internet real estate lead and marketing. Keep this book by your side and use it as a trusted reference guide. Start working on your Web site, and then move onto the other areas of online lead generation and Internet marketing. Once you have your online real estate lead-generation business set up, it really will run 24 X 7, by putting the right message in front of the right people, at the right time.

Agents and Brokers already know they need to market to past clients and their sphere, but it only gets you so far. They also know the urgent need to embrace the internet. The value of traditional farming techniques is diminishing. The fact is, everyone is mailing something; everyone is doing longer open houses; and everyone is getting into the real estate business. But, hardly anyone is doing online advertising. Even fewer are doing it right. In fact, most agents and brokers attempting to do online lead generation and property marketing are doing it totally wrong. Don't waste money and time by buying leads from a company that sells false dreams of Internet riches. Take control of your business lead systems and start implementing your plan today.

Here's a short sample from the book:

Marketing Your Listings for Leads

The majority of this book has been on creating a real business Web site, driving quality traffic to your Web site, and converting that traffic into leads. Now let's focus on how to create more business by marketing your listing online. You've worked long and hard to get the listing, now let's leverage that listing to create more business. For most of the homes I've sold, the buyers began by viewing the pictures and details online and then contacted me about a private showing. If you market the property correctly, you will get leads. Using the list of marketing resources below, I average over 2,500 targeted property views for each listing. I get highly qualified internet buyer and seller leads when marketing a property online. Think about that for a second. Online, people are searching for a specific home, in a specific area, in a specific school district, in a certain price range, etc....and my listings are showing up. That's a ton of quality traffic almost all of it was free.

I just read the other day about a Director of Technology who serves on a major MLS board who said the traditional business model of getting leads from holding open houses is almost dead. People are using the Internet for research, and they are contacting an agent long before they enter the house. Based on my personal experience, I agree with this assessment. Having spent many Sunday's working at open houses, I find it very rare for someone to walk through the door and say "I don't have an agent."

The following list of ideas will put you in a position to actually make more money from each listing you have. If you don't have any listings or are new to real estate, I suggest approaching an agent in your office that has a listing and ask if you can do some Internet advertising for him or her. Just be sure to abide by any local MLS rules you have...

So here's to 2008 and enriching your level of internet real estate education and business income.

Happy New Year, Cheers!

Wednesday, 12 June 2013

Florida Investment Real Estate and What Are Considerations Before Buying

Investment Real Estate, First Things First

Considering investing in property? What are some pertinent things to consider before taking this leap? Of all the investment possibilities, investment in land generally produces the most positive results. It is vital, however, to carefully investigate the pros and cons, benefits and deficits of real estate investment. Most people look at investment real estate as risky and feel woefully inadequate to tackle this form of investing. They feel lost, not knowing where to even begin!

A multitude of information is available and knowing how to search can seem daunting. A web site search will produce boatloads of information, some valuable and some not. Some key words to search are real estate investment, investment property, and investing in real estate. This will begin the process for you. Not all available information is worth your time, however. Beware when the site promises high return for little down. Also beware of sites whose main goal is to solicit your money. Web searching is one form of research. Another is talking to a reputable real estate broker or real estate lawyer. One of the best sources of information is a friend you trust who has done real estate investing. A trustworthy friend who started as a novice and progressed to real investing is probably your best source of reliable information. Their voice of experience rings the loudest since they are a layman like you who had to discover for themselves each step of the way how to make successful investments.

Investment Real Estate, Rental Units

Let's look at some sound reasons for investing in real estate. Real estate generally appreciates at a greater rate than the rate of inflation and offers great tax benefits. Selecting real estate in a desirable location will prove to be profitable especially in burgeoning areas, usually in suburbs which are a reasonable commute to city jobs. Of course the old adage, location, location, location is a very pertinent piece of advice to take to heart. Think of the most expensive housing markets today. If you have lived in an expensive housing market, or have visited there, you will notice that along with exquisite homes offered for sale at exorbitant rates, small, older homes you would never consider buying in another market are being offered for huge dollars. Why? Location, of course. When a housing area becomes desirable, even those small dumpy homes will sell for a considerable amount of money. Let's stop for a moment and look at the advantages of investing in rental units as opposed to purchasing property for resale. One of the largest factors to consider in purchasing property for resale is finding properties that will resell at a higher rate than purchase, of course. Finding these properties is not as easy today as it may have been in the past. It used to be that fixer-uppers and foreclosures were avoided by homeowners and investors alike. Not so today, those same homes are being feverishly snatched up in the current booming housing markets.

Florida Investment Real Estate - Why Florida Is a Good Choice

Finding homes to purchase and turn over quickly for cash is becoming more and more difficult, leading many to consider purchasing property for the purpose of renting. What are some advantages to renting and what locations would be most desirable for purchase with a rental goal in mind? Owning rental property provides some unique advantages. If you have the time as well as the finances to invest, rental property could end up paying for itself in the long term. In order for this to be true, the most important thing to search for is property in a great location for renters. You don't want to be searching for renters for months on end while you are being drained of capital. Those mortgage payments never stop, even when the list of renters has been exhausted. Buying rental investment property in a college town is a good bet for the possibility of continual renters and also buying in transient areas and tourist areas. Of all the above, tourist areas tend to be your surest source of consistent renters. Numerous high density tourist areas exist across the nation, but one of your best bets for purchase and consistent renters would be a sun-drenched spot with a year-round temperate climate. California and Texas would fit the bill, but as we all know, the most desirable locations in California may be out of reach due to the high cost. Texas may be considered a good choice, but only one state ranks as the premier tourist destination in the world and that would be Florida, the sunshine state.

Florida Investment Real Estate - The Orlando Area

With Florida's burgeoning population, Florida investment real estate is a great option. Florida ranks 4th in population behind California, Texas and New York. Florida has one of the fastest rates of growth in the nation, making Florida investment real estate a very attractive option for investors. In the 1990's, Florida grew by 23.5 percent with five counties increasing by more than 60 percent. Projected state growth would bring the population to over 19 million by 2010. An increasingly higher population obviously increases the need for housing. The increasing resident population being a great reason to pursue Florida investment real estate; let's not neglect another face of increasing housing need. Florida has a tourism rate of almost 77 million visitors in 2004, making it the top travel destination in the world and producing $57 billion of income. Tourists flock to all parts of Florida, the beaches being one of the most attractive destinations. However, Orlando pulls in the most visitors, with 2.6 million international travelers, not including the steady stream of domestic tourists. This alone would offer sufficient reason to purchase rental property. But considering that the grand total of tourists visiting Orlando in 2004 was 48 million people, what great housing investment potential for investors! The biggest drawing card in the Orlando area is, of course, Walt Disney World. The area surrounding Disney has a hotel rate occupancy of about 80 percent. It's obvious why the Orlando area is considered one of the most desirable tourist destinations in the world.

Florida Investment Real Estate - What are Reasons Tourists Come to the Orlando Area

Owning Florida investment real estate will give vacationers who visit the Orlando area a place to stay while you collect the rent. Theme park attractions are one of the biggest reasons Orlando has become a #1 tourist destination. The three most popular are Disney, which includes Disney World, Epcot, Animal Kingdom and MGM Studios, Sea World and Universal. Each attraction holds an appeal for people of all ages with families and singles alike enjoying each. Kissimmee is the town closest to Disney where families especially enjoy a few of the more laid back sights including Green Meadows Farm. Green Meadows is in an idyllic country setting with tours of the farm and more than 300 farm animals to touch and see. Also in the Kissimmee area is Horse World Riding Stables. The 750 acres of open pasture beckons horse lovers to enjoy a ride beneath the open sky. The Orlando Science Center beckons science buffs both young and old. Learning happens as a by-product here through the realistic, interactive and just plain fun exhibits. Fabulous night life is to be found both in Kissimmee which boasts two very popular dinner attractions, Medieval Times and Arabian Nights. Both serve delectable large portions of food with fabulous jousting and medieval type entertainment. For the shopper, Shopping and dining abound in the Orlando area also as do all sorts of natural environmental experiences.

Real Estate Investment in Florida - Bimini Bay Resort Florida

A well-kept secret but one located just 5 miles from Disney, in the center of Florida is Davenport, a treasure of a town close to the major attractions, yet a world away. On 80 acres of land in the Davenport area, you will find Bimini Bay Resort, Florida. A grand investment opportunity awaits you at Bimini Bay Resort, Florida where the investor participates in property appreciation but is not affected by negative cash flow during the off season. At Bimini Bay Resort, Florida you will find a planned community of luxurious town homes, offering 3 bedroom two baths that are fully furnished and equipped. Bimini Bay Resort, Florida is unique in that the investor can stay in the purchased unit while on vacation for a minimum fee while renting the unit the rest of the year. Management staff at Bimini Bay Resort finds the renters while you enjoy a guaranteed rental income each month. Planned amenities at Bimini Bay Resort include two major restaurants, a grocery, deli and food court and a sports bar restaurant. Bimini Bay Resort will also include a spa and exercise facility. A large business conference center and twin theaters are also planned at Bimini Bay Resort. Peace of mind will be yours at Bimini Bay Resort with its gated access with security cards. A fantastic real estate investment in Florida at Bimini Bay Resort awaits the investor who desires a consistent income without the headaches of day-to-day management. Bimini Bay Resort is worth investigating.

Our Featured Orlando Properties: You have an opportunity to join one of the fastest growing trends in the United States and the world. Orlando is one of the most explosive markets in the country and the Disney resort area has an average hotel occupancy of around 80%. Orlando is known as the vacation capital of the world and the top rated short term rental market, one that shows tremendous potential for real investors.

Tourism - with 76.8 million visitors in 2004 (a record number), Florida is the top travel destination in the world. The tourism industry has an economic impact of $57 billion on Florida's economy. Click here for additional tourism facts and statistics.

City Population Rank (2000):

(Rounded to the Nearest Thousand)

1. Jacksonville - 736,000

2. Miami - 362,000

3. Tampa - 303,000

4. St. Petersburg - 248,000

5. Hialeah - 226,000

6. Orlando - 186,000

7. Ft. Lauderdale - 152,000

8. Tallahassee - 151,000

9. Hollywood - 139,000

10. Pembroke Pines - 137,000

11. Coral Springs - 118,000

12. Clearwater - 109,000

13. Cape Coral - 102,000

14. Gainesville - 95,000

15. Port St. Lucie - 89,000

16. Miami Beach - 88,000

17. Sunrise - 86,000

18. Plantation - 83,000

19. West Palm Beach - 82,000

20. Palm Bay - 79,000

21. Lakeland - 78,000

22. Pompano Beach - 78,000

23. Davie - 76,000

24. Boca Raton - 75,000

25. Miramar - 73,000

Most Populous Metro Areas (2000):

(Rounded to the Nearest Thousand)

1. Tampa/St. Petersburg/Clearwater - 2,396,000

2. Miami - 2,253,000

3. Orlando - 1,645,000

4. Ft. Lauderdale - 1,623,000

5. Jacksonville - 1,100,000

6. West Palm Beach/Boca Raton - 1,131,000

7. Sarasota/Bradenton - 590,000

8. Daytona Beach - 493,000

9. Lakeland/Winter Haven - 484,000

10. Melbourne/Titusville/Palm Bay - 476,000

11. Fort Myers/Cape Coral - 441,000

12. Pensacola - 412,000

13. Fort Pierce/Port St. Lucie - 319,000

14. Tallahassee - 285,000

15. Ocala - 259,000

16. Naples - 251,000

17. Gainesville - 218,000

18. Fort Walton Beach - 170,000

19. Panama City - 148,000

Home to 11 of the country's 100 fastest-growing counties, a Florida investment property has high potential as a profit-maker, unlike most other areas. Port St. Lucie, Miramar and Cape Coral are the fastest growing cities in Florida. It's unlikely you will make a mistake investing in Florida real estate considering the vast number of tourists and new residents flocking to the land of sun and surf. The most difficult decision to make will be which location in Florida to purchase. Good investments abound in each area of the state, from Miami in the south to Clearwater on the gulf coast, going east to Daytona Beach and north to the panhandle. Selecting a location depends on your goals for purchasing Florida investment property. Carefully consider what you intend to do with your Florida investment property. Will your purchase be used mainly as a rental property for vacationers? Do you intend to have access to the property during certain seasons? Or is your goal rental of the property to local tenants? Some of these questions will help you in narrowing down your search. Once you have determined whether your Florida investment property will be used primarily for vacationers or for local renters, and whether you intend on using it as a vacation resort yourself, it is easier to choose the location.

"Each year is better than the previous one," said Abe Pizam, dean of the University of Central Florida's hospitality management college. "But it's not yet where it should be, or where it was."

Pizam said that, while a weak dollar has helped renew interest in Orlando among some foreign visitors, many are continuing to stay away because of heightened security measures in the United States and the hassles that accompany them, as well as increased opposition to the war in Iraq.

"It's a miracle that, despite that, we have improved our visitor counts," Pizam said. "We cannot deny there is still animosity toward the United States in many parts of the world."

Struggling economies in South America also put the brakes on many potential tourists' travel plans in what historically has been a strong market for Orlando.

According to the bureau's figures, the number of South American visitors have dropped substantially in recent years, from 659,000 in 2000 to fewer than 300,000 last year.

Other signs point to a recent upswing in international traffic, however. Orlando International Airport officials said in June that the airport recorded a 20 percent increase in international passengers compared with the same month last year.

On International Drive, a tourism corridor that benefits heavily from overseas travelers, merchants are noticing the difference.

"It's maybe picked up," said Zach Marino, manager of Texas de Brazil restaurant on International Drive. "In this area it's hard to tell because this is the spot to be. We have a strong international clientele."

Asian visitors increased by nearly 40,000 in 2004, and about 100,000 more Canadians traveled to Orlando last year than in 2003.

The visitors bureau noted that it has stepped up its national and international marketing of Orlando, having pulled back on such advertisements after 9-11.

"Our plan is more back-to-normal in terms of marketing thrust," Peeper said.

New York remained the No. 1 source of domestic out-of-state vacationers to Orlando last year. The Tampa Bay area held on as the top source of in-state visitors.

Experts are predicting that 2005 will exceed last year in terms of both international and domestic visitors.

Earlier this month, Walt Disney World reported percentage growth in the low double digits among international tourists, while the number of domestic customers remained relatively flat during one of the rainiest Junes on record.

"If everything stays stable, we should come out on the international side real well" in 2005, Peeper said.

Thursday, 6 June 2013

Real Estate

If you are planning to buy a home in the next 12 months, a Real Estate agency will give you the opportunity to study listings matching your request as soon as they hit the market. This is really convenient and this can be our first successful step in an efficient collaboration.

A Real Estate agency can provide resources for buyers, sellers, and those seeking information on the internet; we can list any home, in any market, in any season and sell it in record time and profitable conditions.

A Real Estate website can help even the most novice buyer through hid transaction.
If you own a home and you are thinking of offering it for sale, Real Estate Agency web site contains essential information about selecting the right real estate agent, one who is educated and empowered to stage your home for sale, effective marketing, appropriate pricing, the inspection process and how to get the market value of your home.

Real estate Agency is your finest resource for information, photos, property descriptions, maps.
Buyers and sellers can find reports on appraisal and market value, information about buying o selling a home, disclosure, escrow and closing costs, lease options, pricing your home for a quick sale, property taxes, seller financing, short sales, tax considerations, legal considerations, negotiation strategies, selling your home for full price, and so on..
You can also receive much useful information by email, our listings are daily verified and updates.
Real Estate Agency is presenting you faithful and friendly real estate agents; they can assist you to make the best transaction possible.

Real Estate Agency is providing you everything you need to know about buying or selling a property. Because the real estate industry is becoming more sophisticated and challenging everyday, you need a professional from real Estate Agency that understands the industry and is positioned to stay ahead if the game. Real Estate Agency agents are going extra miles to help you achieve your goals. We are constantly research the market and property values so your home is priced effectively from day one; we also make sure that clients know your home is for sale using innovative advertising and marketing techniques to attract prospective buyers.

Real Estate Agency can help you sell your home with useful suggestions to make the house show able, creating eye catching effects, conducting open houses and lacing great ads in the paper. Real Estate Agency can find what a client wants, make tons of searches and find the perfect house for the customer. It is great having a partner trustful and not pushy; to help the client found the perfect house. To buy a house is always a great investment and the way to do it is very important for everyone.

To find a good real estate agent that really cares is not easy! Real Estate Agency is here for you! Our professional agent s will show you houses in a short period of time. When finally you will find your house, the deal will be made without a hitch. Even after you are at your new home, we will contact you to keep you well informed about the entire process.
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Finding the right real estate agent can take a few minutes at Real Estate Agency. You will feel comfortable with the person you choose, especially since you are entrusting this person to guide you in the purchase of the largest transaction you are likely ever to make in your life. Real Estate Agency agents are highly qualified professionals who will b able to guide you safely and easily through the intricacies of buying and selling properties.

Wednesday, 5 June 2013

What's Happening In Real Estate Right Now And Where Is It Going?

1. Analysis of Today's Market

2. Update On Gold

3. Real Estate Prices In South Florida

4. Real Estate Nationwide

5. Yield Curve Is Still Inverted

6. What this means to you

1. Analysis of today's market

As an analyst of the economy and the real estate market, one must be patient to see what unfolds and to see if one's predictions are right or wrong. One never knows if they will be right or wrong, but they must have a sense of humility about it so that they are not blind to the reality of the marketplace.

In March of 2006, my eBook How To Prosper In the Changing Real Estate Marketplace. Protect Yourself From The Bubble Now! stated that in short order the real estate market would slow down dramatically and become a real drag on the economy. We are experiencing this slowdown currently and the economy I feel is not far from slowing down as well. History has repeatedly shown that a slow down in the real estate market and construction market has almost always led to an economic recession throughout America's history.

Let's look at what is happening in the following areas to see what we can gleam from them: Gold, Real Estate in South Florida, Real Estate Nationwide, Yield Curve/Economy and see what this means to you:

2. Gold

If you have read this newsletter and/or the eBook, you know I am a big fan of investing in gold. Why? Because I believe that the US dollar is in serious financial peril. But gold has also risen against all of the world's currencies, not just the US dollar.

Why has gold risen? Gold is a neutral form of currency, it can't be printed by a government and thus it is a long term hedge against currency devaluation. James Burton, Chief Executive of the Gold Council, recently said: "Gold remains a very important reserve asset for central banks since it is the only reserve asset that is no one's liability. It is thus a defense against unknown contingencies. It is a long-term inflation hedge and also a proven dollar hedge while it has good diversification properties for a central bank's reserve asset portfolio."

I agree with Mr. Burton 100%. I believe we will even see a bubble in gold again and that is why I have invested in gold to profit from this potential bubble (Think real estate prices around the year 2002 - wouldn't you like to have bought more real estate back then?)

I had previously recommended that you buy gold when it was between $580 and $600 an ounce. Currently, gold is trading at around $670 an ounce up more than 10% from the levels I recommended. However, gold has some serious technical resistance at the $670 level and if it fails to break out through that level it might go down in the short-term. If it does go down again to the $620 - $640 level, I like it at these levels as a buy. I believe that gold will go to $800 an ounce before the end of 2007.

3. Real Estate in South Florida

Real estate in South Florida has been hit hard by this slowdown as it was one of the largest advancers during the housing boom. The combination of rising homes for sale on the market, the amazing amount of construction occurring in the area and higher interest rates have been three of the major factors of the slowdown.

For every home that sold in the South Florida area in 2006, an average of 14 did not sell according to the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) data. The number of homes available for sale on the market doubled to around 66,000, as sales slowed to their lowest level in 10 years.

Even though home prices were up for the year of 2006, the average asking price for homes in December was down about 13 percent compared to a year ago. From 2001 to 2005, the price of a single-family home in Miami-Dade increased 120 percent to $351,200. This is also similar to what happened in Broward County. The problem is that wages during that time only increased by 17.6% in Miami-Dade, and 15.9% in Broward, according to federal data. This is the other major factor that is contributing to the slowdown - real estate prices far outpaced incomes of potential buyers of these homes.

Another factor that helped drive the South Florida boom in prices was high growth in population in Florida. From 2002 to 2005, more than a million new residents moved to Florida and Florida also added more jobs than any other state. However, the three largest moving companies reported that 2006 was the first time in years that they had moved more people out of the state of Florida than into it. Also, school enrollment is declining which could be another sign that middle-class families are leaving.

By far though, the area of South Florida real estate that will be hit hardest is and will continue to be the condominium market. Due to their lower prices than homes, condos make financial sense in the South Florida area. However, the supply of available condos has tripled over the past year and it will get worse before it gets better. More than 11,500 new condos are expected this year and 15,000 next year with the majority of them being built in Miami.

As a result of the oversupply, asking prices for condos are down 12% in 2006 in Miami to $532,000. And incentives are substituting for price cuts. These incentives include paying all closing costs to free upgrades and more.

The last point to think about affecting South Florida real estate is the escalating costs of property insurance and property taxes. These increasing costs are putting more downward pressure on real estate prices.

My strong belief is that we are only starting to see the slowdown of the South Florida real estate market and that prices will continue to fall. Due to the fact that many real estate investors are pulling out, where are the next wave of buyers going to come from at these current prices? Unless a serious influx of new, high paying jobs enter the South Florida area, real estate prices, just like any asset that falls out of favor after a large runup only have one way to go... down.

4. Real Estate Nationwide

A report released last week from the National Association of Realtors showed that in the last three months of 2006 home sales fell in 40 states and median home prices dropped in nearly half of the metropolitan areas surveyed. The median price of a previously owned, single family home fell in 73 of the 149 metropolitan areas surveyed in the 4th quarter.

The National Association of Realtors report also said that the states with the biggest declines in the number of sales in October through December compared with the same period in 2005 were:

* Nevada: -36.1% in sales

* Florida: -30.8% in sales

* Arizona: -26.9% in sales

* California: -21.3% in sales

Nationally, sales declined by 10.1% in the 4th quarter compared with the same period a year ago. And the national median price fell to $219,300, down 2.7% from the 4th quarter of 2005.

Slower sales and cancellations of existing orders have caused the number of unsold homes to really increase. The supply of homes at 2006 sales rate averaged 6.4 months worth which was up from 4.4 months worth in 2005 and only 4 months worth in 2004.

Toll Brothers, Inc., the largest US luxury home builder, reported a 33% drop in orders during the quarter ending January 31.

Perhaps most importantly, falling home values will further decrease their use of mortgage equity withdrawal loans. In 2006, mortgage equity withdrawal accounted for 2% of GDP growth. Construction added 1% to last years GDP growth, so the importance of these factors are to the health of the US economy are enormous.

The other concern is sub-prime mortgages. Today, sub-prime mortgages amount to 25% of all mortgages, around $665 billion. Add to this the fact that approximately $1 trillion in adjustable-rate mortgages are eligible to be reset in the next two years and we will continue to see rising foreclosures. For example, foreclosures are up five times in Denver. These foreclosed homes come back onto the market and depress real estate values.

The Center for Responsible Lending estimates that as many as 20% of the subprime mortgages made in the last 2 years could go into foreclosure. This amounts to about 5% of the total homes sold coming back on the market at "fire-sales". Even if only 1/2 of that actually comes back on the market, it would cause overall valuations to go down and the ability to get home mortgage equity loans to decrease further.

Prepare yourself now because you can still get great advice from the eBook. Buy it with this secure link:

5. Yield Curve is still inverted!

The yield curve is still inverted. In a normal market, you get more interest (yield) for longer term investments. But very rarely the short-term rates become higher than long term rates such as now.

History has shown that an inverted yield curve is the best indicator of a future recession. The yield curve has been inverted since last fall, and if history is any judge we should be in a recession by the 3rd quarter of 2007. Throughout history, we have never had an inverted yield curve without a recession within the next 4 quarters.

The inverted yield curve does not cause the recession, it is simply a signal that something is out of whack in the economy.

6. What this means to you

One of two things could happen going forward in the real estate market: real estate prices will go up or they will go down. History has shown us that any asset that runs up, must come down, whether we are talking about the Dutch Tulip Market, the stock market bubble, the gold bubble of the early 1980s, or Japan's run-up in housing in the 1980's and subsequent 15 year decrease in values.

The big picture of the real estate market is that it goes up and down in cycles. It has been in an up cycle for 10 years and it is most likely time for it to face it's down cycle.

This is the natural cycle of assets:

* Markets go up

* Greed and insanity take over

* An excess forms (i.e. overbuilding)

* A downturn corrects the excesses in the market

This natural cycle is the same principle in "the big picture" as crash dieting is in "the little picture". We starve ourselves to lose 15 pounds, which shuts down our body for the short term, only for it to crank up higher when we go back to "normal" eating patterns.

And speaking of diets, I heard from an old high school buddy who has lost weight on a "cookie" diet where he eats one high protein dinner a day and only 6 low fat cookies throughout the day whenever he is hungry. While he has lost weight on this 800 calorie a day diet, I can't see how it is healthy to starve yourself like that. He told me that whenever he breaks his diet and eats any sodium, he immediately gains one and a half pounds. Talk about your body out of whack! I still recommend exercise ( combined with a low white-carb diet (no white bread, white pastas, and limited sugars). It works for me.

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***Disclaimer: This information and the corresponding websites do not constitute professional services, including, but not limited to investment advice. Please consult a finance and/or investment professional for services and advice.

Sunday, 2 June 2013

Why Do You Need A Real Estate Agent?

Purchasing or selling a real estate is very complex and too risky to invest money. Because of this, it is cleverly to seek for a trustworthy and knowledgeable real estate agent to prevent regrets in the future. There are many reasons why a real estate agent is needed in buying or selling a real estate.

If you don't have any idea of the procedures in buying a real estate, a real estate agent is the person who can help you. License brokers or real estate agents have a thorough knowledge that can help you ensure the legality of papers and real estate procedures.

If you're new to the area, do a simple research of properties in the neighborhood. Try to ask some people living their about the amenities and hints about the community. Finding a knowledgeable real estate agent is the best idea. Real estate sales agents have a vast knowledge regarding real estate market in their area. They know the laws and guidelines regarding real estate matters. They also can recommend what is the best for you and your budget.

If you urgently need to buy or sell a real estate, an expert real estate agent can help you. A professional real estate agent has many friends, associate and contacts that can speed up the process if you urgently need to buy and sell a real estate. These will help you save time and effort and can possibly sell you're real estate property immediately or aid you in finding your target house.

If you're too busy working or doing something very important and don't have the time in dealing with real estate transactions, A real estate agent will serve as your personal representative in buying or selling a real estate. Also, if you don't have the abilities of a sales person, the agent serves as your spoke person to deal with your business clients.